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Music Theory for the Ukulele
by Dean (1four5)

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Ukulele Chord Forms

Ukulele Notes

Key Chord Chart

Basic 12-Bar Blues

Lead Notes for Baritone

Bar Chords

Other Techniques

My Favorite Moves

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Notes on the Ukulele

The diagram below represents all the notes on a ukulele for the three most popular tunings. The middle fret board is the standard tuning for most ukes (commonly called C tuning), and the right fret board is the standard tuning for a baritone uke. The fret board on the left is commonly called D tuning and is 1 step higher (2 frets) than C tuning.

Using the fret board pictures, you can make a chord from the chord chart, and whatever note the "R" falls on in the fret board picture, is the chord you are making. You may notice that some chords have two R's. This is because they are the same note an octave apart.

Let’s try an example. Make the first chord listed in "Minor" on the chord chart. Make it so that you are fretting 3 notes on the 3rd fret and the one note on the 5th fret. Now look at the fret board picture for GCEA tuning. The "R" from the chord chart lands on the C note, so you would be playing a Cminor, or Cm. If you slid this same chord down to where you were playing three notes with open strings, and the one note on the second fret, it would be an Am. Once you have that figured out, you can move on to the Key Chord Chart.

2-notes